Summer
Math Skills

Dates & Things to Review & Remember
As We Countdown to School


Tax Free Weekend in North Carolina: August 5- 7, 2011


Print School Calendar: School Begins - Thursday, August 25, 2011


Check Open House Dates: Click on your child's school for information


Review Bell Schedules & School Supply Lists


Sign Up for a PAYPAMS Account: This is an electronic lunch account


Volunteers Needed for PTA Event




When: Saturday, August 27, 2011


Where: First Ward Creative Arts Academy
715 North Caldwell Street
Charlotte, NC, 28202


Time: Volunteers are needed to work various times, click here for more details and to register to volunteer to assist Family and Community Services with this event.


Click here to register to volunteer









Dining Out With Kids Who Have Food Allergies
For the millions of families who have children with food allergies and intolerances, eating out often can be frustrating and stressful. Moms and Dads hope all restaurants will cater to food-allergic kids, but some restaurants are far more accommodating than others. Read more about what to ask when dining out. Read More Here

Summer Social Studies Activities
Believe it or not, children actually like to do some schoolwork during their summer vacation. Read what two experts suggest as age-appropriate social studies activities that are enjoyable and also keep the brain engaged during the summer break. Read More Here

Why Kids Act Out
Though school-aged children act out in a variety of ways and circumstances, many behavioral problems manifest themselves in sibling, peer, parent or teacher relationships. If a child displays a new negative behavior, chances are there's a reason the bad habit started. Read More Here
Closing the Summer Reading Gap
Did you know that your student may be a victim of summer reading loss?






Students can lose up to three months' worth of reading progress over one summer. And, if you take
into consideration all summers combined, students could possibly lose 1.5 years' worth of reading progress.


Summer reading loss can be defeated through time spent reading with your student, providing a variety of reading material, using various Internet resources, and encouraging them to just read for fun and the pleasure of learning!


Click here to learn more about reading skills
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Summer
Math
Skills






According to a study by the Partnership for Learning, an average student can forget 60 percent of the math skills they learned during the school year.


Simple card games can teach and keep multiplication or addition skills fresh; assisting parents with menu planning, or home improvement projects teach and reinforce problem solving; an inexpensive stopwatch can open dozens of doors and questions of time and rate of speed ratios.


This summer especially, challenging a child to determine the cost of gasoline for a day or weekend trip can be very instructive. While empowering him or her to find answers to such questions.
Here are tips to enhance summer learning in math:

1. Set a budget for a picnic and ask your child to "find the bargains" using the price per ounce figures on the supermarket shelves: "which one is really cheaper?"

2. Play "War" with a deck of cards, but with math twists: each player throws down two (or three) cards and adds or multiplies them ? the highest (or lowest) sum or product wins the hand.? Ask your child to invent a new version with the math he or she knows.

3. Dominos: an old fashioned game that teaches number sense, strategy, and problem solving and strengthens those skills at any grade level.

4. Cook: Following recipes, cutting it in half for fewer servings, or tripling it for a large gathering teaches very practical skills. Even a batch of lemonade can reinforce these skills.

5. Track the temperature and humidity over the summer -- plot it on a chart.

6. When doing home improvement projects large or small, even young children can assist with taking measurements and computing amounts of materials needed and feel great pitching in as well.

7. Involve children in gardening: have the children determine the area of the garden.? Have them calculate the amount of space taken up by tomatoes versus cucumbers, etc. Have students weigh the vegetables after they are picked.

8. Have children set up a simple rain gauge to measure the amount of rain over the course of a month or the whole summer.

9. Get an odometer for their bicycles and to use the distance traveled to calculate their average rate of speed. Children love to know how fast and how far they go.

10. If you ride the links, have your children use a stopwatch to calculate the average rate of speed a train travels between stations. You can even sometimes get an employee to tell them if they're on target.

11. Have your children keep a chart indicating how much time they spend reading, watching television, doing chores, and playing. Children can determine what fraction of the day or week they spend on each activity. Students can also keep a chart indicating how they spend money each week.







According to a study by the Partnership for Learning, an average student can forget 60 percent of the math skills they learned during the school year.


Simple card games can teach and keep multiplication or addition skills fresh; assisting parents with menu planning, or home improvement projects teach and reinforce problem solving; an inexpensive stopwatch can open dozens of doors and questions of time and rate of speed ratios.


This summer especially, challenging a child to determine the cost of gasoline for a day or weekend trip can be very instructive. While empowering him or her to find answers to such questions.
Here are tips to enhance summer learning in math:

1. Set a budget for a picnic and ask your child to "find the bargains" using the price per ounce figures on the supermarket shelves: "which one is really cheaper?"

2. Play "War" with a deck of cards, but with math twists: each player throws down two (or three) cards and adds or multiplies them ? the highest (or lowest) sum or product wins the hand.? Ask your child to invent a new version with the math he or she knows.

3. Dominos: an old fashioned game that teaches number sense, strategy, and problem solving and strengthens those skills at any grade level.

4. Cook: Following recipes, cutting it in half for fewer servings, or tripling it for a large gathering teaches very practical skills. Even a batch of lemonade can reinforce these skills.

5. Track the temperature and humidity over the summer -- plot it on a chart.

6. When doing home improvement projects large or small, even young children can assist with taking measurements and computing amounts of materials needed and feel great pitching in as well.

7. Involve children in gardening: have the children determine the area of the garden.? Have them calculate the amount of space taken up by tomatoes versus cucumbers, etc. Have students weigh the vegetables after they are picked.

8. Have children set up a simple rain gauge to measure the amount of rain over the course of a month or the whole summer.

9. Get an odometer for their bicycles and to use the distance traveled to calculate their average rate of speed. Children love to know how fast and how far they go.

10. If you ride the links, have your children use a stopwatch to calculate the average rate of speed a train travels between stations. You can even sometimes get an employee to tell them if they're on target.

11. Have your children keep a chart indicating how much time they spend reading, watching television, doing chores, and playing. Children can determine what fraction of the day or week they spend on each activity. Students can also keep a chart indicating how they spend money each week.